11 responses

  1. James Byrne
    June 26, 2012

    Great post and very apt given the current economic climate which doesn’t look like it’s going to improve anytime soon.

    The big issue I see with “option b” is that most people are worried that reducing the size of the house will require them to have to reapply for new permission and delay the project even further. There is also the added expense of having to resubmit new plans, etc…

    Are there any published planning guidelines or precedents on this issue? So for example you don’t need permission if you scale down the design by say 10% of floor area but if it’s more than 10% then you should reapply for new permission.

    Reply

    • markstephensarchitect
      June 26, 2012

      Excellent comment; I tend not to charge for a resubmission (I’m probably in minority and see previous post on ‘Why architects are too helpful!).

      Next blog post will address issue you raise, watch this space…

      Reply

  2. Heckety
    August 24, 2012

    We built seven years ago when all 3 children were still in school, but as economically with space as we thought possible. Two left for college and I felt we were living in a blooming castle and why didn’t we forsee this? Now one child is partially disabled (unforseen) and unemployed (unforseen also) so is home a lot of the time and suddenly the downstairs bed and extra bathroom is essential. And last week the other decided she couldn’t stick the part-time job and will be living at home to finish college for the next two years. Suddenly its a full house again, and they all expect to bring home their social lives too…

    And this is just a run of the mill four bed we’re talking- I seriously wonder how some people can even afford to heat their homes, let alone build them! And did I say its almost a passive solar design so our heating costs are pretty low??!!

    Reply

    • markstephensarchitect
      August 24, 2012

      Cheers for comment, you sound busy! All true also Mark

      Reply

  3. Mark Stephens
    October 22, 2014

    Reblogged this on Mark Stephens Architects and commented:

    I wrote this in 2012; follow up post later…

    Reply

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