Want to be a good architect, study psychology first…

A very short and simple post which I’m not going to give reasons for but if you want to be an architect, forget whether you should do Art or Technical Graphics at Leaving Cert or A Levels.

Instead do a degree in psychology first, and yes, I’m not joking

UK Course details here

And Irish Courses here

Trust me, it’s the best advice I’ll ever give!

14 thoughts on “Want to be a good architect, study psychology first…

  1. I didn’t take this route, but looking back I can see the benefit in your advice. It seems in the USA, the architect’s role is radically changing and our ideology, philosophy and other intangible design abilities are often not sought or desired.

    In fact I feel at times they harm us because the “market” is just looking for a simple service to design and produce documents to fit within the budget. In other words, a desire for “architecture” has waned in recent years. Architects are often brought in after the big idea, program and budget is set to work out the details and stamp the drawings. So must work within the existing system and cultural and economic context to gain respect and a sharehold again.

  2. Hello! I’m going to university in Canada next year, and I got accepted to Architecture and didn’t apply to a B.Sc. in psychology (but am thinking of applying), but there’s a HUGE debate in my mind about whether I should study one or the other. I am a very creative and artistic person and I love design and science and understanding people, but my drawing skills could use a boost. I am afraid that by choosing one thing, it will “waste” time if I decide to pursue the other later on… And then there’s the question of the fabled all-nighters pulled as an Architecture student… (I value sleep)… What do you think?

    1. Hi Sabrina

      Thanks for comment, couple of comments/suggestions:

      * What does your heart say to do, what do you think you would get the most passion over? Helping people with their minds or with their buildings? What do you think will give you the greatest excitement?

      * Do you know an architect or psychologist you could spend the day with to get a flavour of what the work would entail. Very often the reality of the work is different to the perception-there’s a lot more paperwork. & red tape in architecture than design.

      * even if you choose the ‘wrong’ course it will still benefit you ; a years psychology will make you a better architect & vice-versa

      * I’d recommend Bob Borsons blog http://www.lifeofanarchitect.com to give a great flavour of what an architects life is about

      Hope this helps

      Mark

    2. Hi Sabrina,

      I’m in almost the exact situation as you, but seeing you posted around a year ago I am actually really interested as to where you are now and how you made your decision and your reflection on it.
      I would love to here back if you have time! Thank you!

      -Olga

  3. Hello!
    I found your short blog, while debating over quitting psychology and applying for graphic design or architecture. Could you please give at least a few reasons to your short comment? That would help me greatly.

    I am worried of quitting psychology, because I see benefits of staying, but I want to grow artistically/creatively as well!

    Thank you for an answer in advance!

    1. Hi Olga

      What would you like love the most? psychology or architecture – would you like to be a psychologist who has an interest in architecture or an architect who has an interest in psychology. Would you like to be a architectural psychologist? Someone who who’s a specialist in the psychology of people as they inhabit architecture. Lots to think about

      Mark

      1. Hello Mark,

        Thank so much for your quick answer. I’ve never really thought about it that way! Definitely lots to think about.
        I’m afraid I won’t have enough knowledge(and validity!) as an architect if I take the “psychologist interested in architecture” path and vice versa.

        In your experience as an architect, would you welcome a psychologist (who has a second education in architecture/design) into the actual design team? Or what functions could a architectural psychologist perform?
        And what really is the balance between architecture and psychology in the field?

        Thanks in advance!

        Olga

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